How Many Baskets? How Many Balls?  

Samford's first baseball team, formed in 1878, poses for the camera.
Samford’s first baseball team, formed in 1878, poses for the camera.

A few weeks ago, Samford opened its new Sports Hall of Fame on the third floor of the Pete Hanna Center, celebrating the achievements of students from the very beginnings of the school’s athletic program in 1901. In honor and celebration of this grand opening, we combed through Garrett’s Sixty Years of Howard College to find the origins of baseball, football, and basketball at Howard. The first sport to break onto Howard’s campus was baseball, as Garret recorded in his work:

“When the soldiers returned from the Civil War, they brought baseball with them. The game grew rapidly in public favor and soon found a ready place in all the schools. The students of the University of Alabama were playing baseball as early as 1872. The first reference to a game by Howard boys is the following from the Marion Commonwealth of April 11, 1878:

‘A game of baseball was played last Saturday (April 6) between a nine of the Howard College club and a nine of the Southern University club, of Greensboro. The game was hotly contested and resulted in the favor of the Howard College club by a score of 42 to 35.’ When it is remembered that the Southern University at Greensboro was the progenitor of Birmingham-Southern, the Howard boys ought to appreciate this score.”

Football came next on screen, taking over the campus for almost a decade before an official team could form. Garrett continues:

“Football, as the game is now played, came into vogue in the nineties. In all probability, the first movement to introduce football into the colleges of Alabama is described in the following news item from the Age-Herald of January 11, 1891:

The famous game between Howard College and the University of Alabama in 1935 that ended in a tie.
The famous game between Howard College and the University of Alabama in 1935 that ended in a tie.

‘The meeting was called to order by Cadet Frank Peabodly, and it was decided to adopt the American intercollegiate football rules. . . The students of the different colleges are very anxious to make this association a success, as it will be both a pleasure and a benefit to them. The students fear, as this is a new move, that they will have opposition from some members of the different facilities: but as the leading colleges in the North favor such associations, they hope, by playing on holidays and Saturdays, to be allowed to proceed. The first game will probably be played within the next month, and the boys hope to be encouraged by a large crowd to witness their first attempt.’

At Howard College some of the boys may have been seen, at certain seasons of the year, kicking a football about the campus; but no football team was organized at Howard until the fall of 1902. The first football coach at Howard was Houston Gwin, an old Auburn man, and the first intercollegiate game was played with the Marion Military Institute on October 26, in which Howard was victorious by a score of 6 to 0.”

Nevertheless, organizing a game without established conferences can make the first few seasons a little rocky, leading college presidents to take matters into their own hands. In 1946, Spright Dowell of Mercer University wrote Major Davis, saying that,

“It occurs to me, therefore, that it might be exceedingly helpful if you, President Allen, of Stetson, and President Plyler, of Furman,  and I with, say one other member of our respective staffs in attendance also might meet at some convenient time and place and as early as practicable and see if we can reconcile our points of view and possibly organize a league of our own that we could control and keep on a strictly amateur, non-subsidy basis. . . Does this idea of a conference appeal to you and, if so, would you think it well to meet in Atlanta, Macon, or somewhere else, and how soon could you conveniently attend?”

Major Davis agreed, writing back that “In my opinion it would be helpful for us to hold a conference as suggested in your letter, and ascertain whether or not we could find a solution of this very pressing problem which you mention. I would be glad to attend, if you arrange it.” Who knew that all it took was a letter or two to start a conference?

Basketball, on the other hand,  didn’t make its debut at Howard College until 1900, sparking much debate and curiosity across campus.  While it’s hard to imagine a world without basketball in our lives so soon after the NCAA tournament finals, students had had no prior experience with the sport, leading to this humorous reception:

Howard College's basketball team in 1901, a year after the first game on campus. Note that they're now Inter-Collegiate Champions!
Howard College’s basketball team in 1901, a year after the first game on campus. Note that they’re now Inter-Collegiate Champions!

“‘When it was announced two or three weeks ago that we would play our first game of basket ball on the next Thursday afternoon, there was a visible stir in the camp. What is it like? How many baskets? How many balls? Was heard on every hand. Every man has his own basket, was the information volunteered by one who, no doubt, was better acquainted with picking cotton than with this new game.

The memorable afternoon came and with it a great rush for the ‘peanut gallery’ in the gymnasium. Even our ever-attentive matron neglected to give Peter his daily scolding in order to get off in time to see this wonderful game.

‘Boys, I believe we could sell preserved seats to these games,’ said a mercenary looking Freshman, as we crowded up the back stairway.

Finally the instructor called out the chosen men to take their places, and the game began. ‘I don’t see any baskets,’ said several spectators; and for a while it seemed that the players also failed to see the baskets. After much puffing and blowing and many fouls, one side succeeded in making a score.’”

Nevertheless, Howard College quickly caught on and continued to win game after game in its region, beating rival Birmingham-Southern several times over and becoming famous for their skill on the court.

Over one hundred years later, the Samford athletics program has churned out 7 NFL drafts, basketball teams that appeared twice in March Madness, and 22 drafted baseball players. The new Sports Hall of Fame will make an important connection for current student athletes and Bulldog fans to the humble foundations of their sports on this campus.

Adapted From:

Sixty Years of Howard College, 1842-1902 by Mitchell B. Garrett

-Letters between Spright Dowell and Harwell G. Davis, 1946

101 Bulldogs: A Centennial Celebration

Four girls try to match the mascot's smile in this shot from 1956.
Four girls try to match the mascot’s smile in this shot from 1956.

Football season is upon us and visions of our trusty mascot are everywhere to spur on school spirit. The bulldog is proudly displayed on uniforms, t-shirts, and collectible cups – even spray painted on the center of the field. The costumed Spike runs, jumps, and cajoles the crowds to cheer louder. We even have our own live mascot, Rex, who parades about during Homecoming, eager for belly rubs and treats.

It’s no surprise, then, that Samford’s best friend’s makeover is a weighty subject. As a celebration of the school’s 175th anniversary and part of Samford’s re-branding process, a new design of the Crimson Bulldog is being released today and tomorrow in special viewing sessions across campus. While you’re waiting eagerly to see the new canine face of Samford, take some time to learn about the reason behind our mascot and the stories it holds.

A 1920 Entre Nous boasts this cartoon of a bulldog for a title paper.
A 1920 Entre Nous boasts this cartoon of a bulldog for a title paper.

It all began in December of 1916, when the Crimson Bulldogs won out over the Baptist Bears in a school-wide vote. This decision may have been made in part because of Howard College’s then-arch rival, Birmingham Southern College, who championed themselves as the Panthers. In fact, Howard College used to be more feline friendly, playing as the Baptist Tigers several years prior to the vote until a quickly-growing school called Auburn came onto the college-football scene.

From there, it was love at first sight. The new mascot appeared everywhere, from the title pages of the Entre Nous and the cover of the student handbook to cameos with cheerleaders and sprints up and down the field during games. The image was so important that a stuffed felt bulldog was one of the few objects walked over from the old campus in East Lake to Homewood to represent the Howard spirit. Myralyn Allgood, alumna of 1961, recalls picking up the mascot for football games from the president’s house:

[The Wrights] were at every event, and they kept our mascot.  The Duke, he was called, the Duke of Samford, he was a bulldog. He lived at their house.  So my job before every football game was to go get him and bring him.  And we ran out on the field, and I got to take Duke, and he was always chewing on my socks.  I almost fell over him several times.  But it’s just that kind of relationship.

However, there’s no history without tragedy, and it struck during Billy Gamble’s time as superintendent of the physical plant on campus in the 1970s. He relates the story below:

Duke takes a rest from his job of encouraging the students and team.
Duke takes a rest from his job of inspiring the students and the team.

We had a bulldog always as the mascot of Samford University, and [Duke], I believe, was the name of the bulldog that was the current mascot, but he was getting kind of old. And somehow or other, somebody had donated another brand new young bulldog to take his place. And in the middle of a football game, we were going to have the change of the guard . . . it was early in August, or maybe September, but the day was hot, and the dog was dry… And finally by the time the sun went down, they carried old Beauregard back down to his lot up on the Wright’s. Sunday morning, before I could go to church, I had a call that said Beauregard died from heat stroke … And she wondered if I could get somebody from the Physical Plant and come by and get him.  So . . . me and Curt Stevens went to the Wright’s.  By the Physical Plant we found an old footlocker which made an excellent coffin for Beauregard. We went up and behind their garage or somewhere up there, and we dug a fitting grave for Beauregard . . . . We were ready to throw the first dirt back on top of the coffin when Mrs. Wright and Dr. Wright came out to hold a little service. And Dr. Wright made a very appropriate prayer and wished Beauregard well in dog heaven . . . . 

Fortunately, this tragic accident has never happened since, and the lineage of bulldogs continues today with Rex, who ascended to his rank in 2011 after his predecessor, Libby, retired. Libby was the first live mascot in the previous three decades.  Following her death in 2011, she became the second canine to receive an honorary degree from the university, specializing as a “Doctor of Canine Humanities”. Today, her successor carries on the tradition, and we can all agree that seeing Rex at the tailgates makes Homecoming an even more festive experience.

So wear the new Samford swag with pride – there are one hundred years of Crimson Bulldog history behind the new logo, which recalls Samford’s past glory while coupling it with Samford’s hopes for the future. And, as always, bow wow Bulldogs!

 

References:

Oral History interview with Myralyn Allgood conducted by Bryan Kessler, November 14, 2012.

Oral History interview with Billy Gamble conducted by Michelle Little, August 23, 2012.

Philip Poole. “Libby, Samford’s Bulldog Mascot, Dies.” Samford University. 30 September 2011. https://www.samford.edu/news/2011/Libby-Samfords-Bulldog-Mascot-Dies

“Bulldogs, Tigers, and Bears.” Samford University Library – Special Collections and University Archives. January 2008. http://library.samford.edu/about/sc/treasure/2008/bulldogs.html

“Lady Liberty ‘Libby’.” Samford University Library – Special Collections and University Archives. 2012. http://library.samford.edu/about/sc/treasure/2012/libby.html 

 

March Madness: Dead Cats and Burning Bulldogs

“Dead cats and burning bulldogs preluded the half-finished game with [Birmingham-] Southern. Tension that has mounted and grown game by game during the past several years came to a head Tuesday night. ‘Unfortunate incidents’ come to all our lives, each with a lesson.”

That is how the Howard Crimson described the fracas that broke out during the basketball game between Howard College and Birmingham-Southern in February 1957. The two schools maintained a fierce rivalry most often marked by students traveling to the opponent’s campus for a good-natured tree rolling or some other practical joke.

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Rudy Davidson: Leading up to that game, it went on every year, Howard folks would go over to Southern’s campus and throw a prank and Southern people would come to Howard and throw a prank.

For the 1957 season, however, the students from Birmingham-Southern decided to up the ante in a stunt involving the Sherman Oak, a beloved tree located in the center of the campus. The oak was so famous among students that he was parodied with a weekly front-page opinion column written from his point of view in the Crimson.  On February 15, 1957 Sherman Oak shared his terrifying tale:

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Sherman Oak: The other night, Sunday, February 10, to be exact, when you so rudely attacked our campus, I don’t appreciate at all the damage that was done to me. The very idea, throwing kerosene on me and trying to burn me down. I was so humiliated and scared that I could hardly cry out.

Fortunately, a quick-thinking and resourceful student, who you may remember from our previous post about a certain ghoulish Halloween escapade in Renfroe Hall, was nearby.

Sherman Oak: If the noble Quinn Kelley had not fought your crew off single-handed and very bravely put sand on my flames, I would probably be little more than a burned out stump now.

In addition to the attempted arson of the Sherman Oak, the Birmingham News reported a few Howard girls being woken up in the middle of the night because they heard men chanting “Down with Howard, Up with Southern!” When they looked outside, there were three crosses on fire in front of the burning tree–an ominous warning and a symbol of Aryan superiority during the Civil Rights era.

By gameday, tensions had reached their boiling point. With less than four minutes left in the first half of the game, Howard was beating Southern 33-24.  Chriss Doss later recalled the chaos that unfolded when a Southern player named Glen Clem took a cheap shot at Howard player Rudy Davidson (pictured above).

Chriss Doss: Everything was already heated up and they [Howard] had this fellow named [Louis] Doss, who worked full time running a steam shovel in a strip mine . . . but he was also going to school and playing basketball . . . he was one of our leading players, but he was sitting on the bench. The coach had taken him out and put somebody else in . . . a tall, spindly fella, [who] didn’t look like he could stand too much. He needed to be fed more, but . . . was playing forward. Southern had the basketball and they were going toward their goal when a Howard player intercepted the ball and the player named Rudy . . . was way down toward Howard’s goal and this fellow drew back and threw the ball to Rudy and Rudy caught it, bounced it a time or two and went up to shoot, to make the goal and this Southern student hit him, I mean plowed into him, and of course it was an interesting issue for debate. Did he intend to do it or was it an accident? Anyway, it knocked Rudy into the bleachers . . . and Doss is up [off the bench] because Doss is this terribly muscular fella and he has, during the season, been the caretaker for Rudy, and he saw this fella hit Rudy and he was down there in a split second and drew back and hit the Southern player and. . . laid him up in the bleachers with his fist and blood started squirting. The place went wild. We didn’t have any security . . . this is the only time I ever saw Major Harwell Davis just disheveled . . . They finally got things quieted down and he goes out to the center of the court and says, “Those of you who live on campus, go to your dormitories and stay there. Those of you who do not live on campus, as soon as possible, make your way off of the campus and don’t come back!”

According to the Birmingham News’s account, the fight got so out of hand that the coaches decided it was best not to play the second half of the game. Southern player Glen Clem, who some claim instigated the fight, was severely cut “clear through his lip.”  His teammate, Hilton Jones, had more serious injuries.  He suffered a broken nose, bruises on his back, abrasions on his chest, and had to remain hospitalized due to a brain concussion.

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Unfortunately, this was just the first round of fighting as tensions remained high, Chriss Doss explained.

Chriss Doss: They vacated the building, but there’s a lot of [people] milling around on campus and there were, I don’t know, three or four students down toward the north end of the campus . . . saw somebody do something and then all of a sudden a blaze shot up on old Sherman. Howard students came running from every direction, taking off their jackets or getting anything they could to beat it out.

With the fire extinguished, the perpetrators were apprehended and their fates rested in the hands of Howard students who became judge, jury, and…barber. Rudy Davidson recalled the vigilante justice handed out by the students of Howard.

Rudy Davidson: Well some of our fellows captured them and when they caught them, some of our folks talked the night watchman into opening up Old Main, to hold a trial. So it woke everybody up on campus and the auditorium soon filled up and I don’t know if they provided a defense attorney for the perpetrators or not, but we had our pre-law students to judge them and they held court. Of course they found them guilty and they asked what was going to be the sentence.

The Howard students decided that the punishment would be an H shaved into the heads of the offenders, who begged the court for mercy, as this would cost them dearly, in more ways than one.

Rudy Davidson: The Southern boys made a plea, “Please don’t shave an H in our head. We’re ministerial students . . . We have church and we can’t do that. We’ll lose our pay.”

After experiencing two attempts of burning the Sherman Oak, a cross burning, a basketball brawl, and then a third burning attempt, the Howard students were in no mood for leniency, however.

Rudy Davidson: They made their plea and I don’t remember all of it but anyhow the Baptist ministerial student says, “Well we preach the Word and we don’t worry about reimbursement. Shave the heads.” So we shaved the heads, shaved an H in their heads and turned them loose.

It is unknown what became of the men who had to travel home and, assumedly, to church the following Sunday with a “H” reminiscent of a scarlet letter, shaved into the back of their heads.

Howard and Southern’s basketball coaches deliberated on whether or not to have their teams play each other again at all. Howard’s Coach Virgil Ledbetter, explained that he was willing to continue playing Birmingham-Southern in the coming years as long as his opponent was willing.  Coach Bill Burch, the head coach of Southern’s squad was unsure, as he explained to reporters after the game.

Coach Burch: I hate to make a statement in the frame of mind I’m in right now.  I will say I’ve never seen anything like it in my life. I know I try to control my bench. If my boys can’t play basketball, I don’t want them out.

In the end, the two schools did not play again until 1961, after heated tempers cooled down, bruises healed, and hair regrew.

  • Glen Clem went on to a successful career coaching basketball at Walker College in Jasper from 1959 to 1996.
  • Hilton Jones recovered from his injuries and graduated from Birmingham-Southern College later in 1957.
  • Rudy Davidson graduated from Howard College in 1958 and worked for the State Department of Education and taught school finance and organization at UAB for 24 years.
  • Chriss Doss graduated from Howard College in 1957 and went on to study theology, library science, and law. He worked as the law librarian at Samford before working in state and local politics. He returned to his alma mater to work as director of the Samford University Center for the Study of Law and the Church until his retirement in 2005. Today he operates a law office in Hoover.
  • Sherman Oak was eventually struck by lightning and cut down in 1998. The oak is survived by several trees at the present campus of Samford University.

Adapted from:

The Birmingham News, February 13, 1957.

The Howard Crimson, February 15, 1957.

Oral History Interview with Chriss Doss conducted by Michelle Little, 2014.

Oral History Interview with Rudy Davidson conducted by Michelle Little, 2012.

The Train to Auburn

Howard College Football Team 1928-29

The Howard College Football Team, 1928

On October 27, 1928, students, faculty, and fans of Howard College traveled to the campus of Auburn University to cheer on the bulldogs in a rivalry football game.  Unlike college football games of today, there was no tailgate, and no caravan of fans with Samford flags waving from their car windows.  In 1928, everyone boarded a train for Opelika, called the “Central of Georgia Special”.  Fans aboard the “Georgia Special” spent the ride talking, telling stories, and chanting for their team.  Although this ride may seem strange by current standards, the train to Auburn rallied Howard College behind the football team and in spirit for their school.  They got to know each other and grew in unity.  Unfortunately, that day, Howard fell to Auburn 25-6. After the game, the fans were not able to stick around, they had to catch the train back home.

On Saturday, the bulldogs will take on Auburn University for the 27th time, and Samford is looking to get its first win against the tigers. Many Samford students, faculty, and alumni are set to attend, and there will be university-sponsored tailgates surrounding Auburn’s Jordan-Hare Stadium.  Students and faculty are sure to reminisce, tell stories, and cheer for their team.  Although the mode of transportation may have changed, some things, like the school spirit of Samford University, never will.

Great Crowd Attends Auburn Game Via Special Train And Otherwise

Fine spirit is manifested on trip with freshmen living up to their reputation of greenness.  Railroad officials extend every courtesy possible.

Some one hundred and twenty five Howard students and supporters pulled out aboard the Central of Georgia Special to Auburn on Saturday, October 27…Typical of all Howard crowds, there was much spirit manifested. Very few were able to name all of the topics of conversation or (bull) which made the rounds. Old cronies got together, old friends met new ones, and there was a fine spirit of friendship and closeness throughout the whole trip. Freshmen lived up to their reputation of greenness…there was a constant parade through the train as is always the case. Many were so absorbed in the scenery and other matters that they hardly knew what was happening. Even these awoke from their trance when the band was tooting forth many strains of more or less familiar music. This happened after about one-half the distance had been covered…Every one was feeling good and real pep was exhibited for the first time this year.

Upon arriving in Opelika, we were left stranded by our trusty C. of G…we found ourselves in the loveliest village of the plains…As usual, the band started off the excitement with a parade through the town. Other rooters followed in a long line…As a preliminary to the game, one of the fraternities staged a stunt for an initiation. This sent the crowd into roars of laughter. Both bands played music of the usual nature. Auburn showed a remarkable spirit. Those who went can certainly appreciate what the Auburn Spirit really is. Not to be outdone, the Howard side opened up with all the reserve that they have been holding in all this season, and each supporter yelled as he has never yelled before. All the yells went over in big style. This spirit lasted throughout the game. Two minutes after the kick off, Howard scored and the bunch went wild. It looked too easy. [But] every one knows what a rude awakening we had…ask those who saw it. Auburn opened up with a bang on their touchdown. A great demonstration was given. It was the first score for them this year.

We lost, but we went down fighting…After the final whistle it did not take long for the crowd to scatter. Hasty departures were made. The [train] pulled off from Opelika at 7:00. This time there was still a fine spirit shown. Howard should be proud of its representation. Howard is proud of its team. The return trip was somewhat quiet…Having been beaten in the way we were, we are glad that it was Auburn rather than some of our other rivals. Special thanks should be given for the way we were received and treated…and appreciation should be shown to the Central of Georgia Railroad for the many favors they granted us…They are all right. Record time was made to Birmingham, the time required being only three hours.

Not one who went on this trip is sorry. Except for the defeat, nothing happened to be sorry for. Those who went acted as real Howard students…With only three games remaining, all efforts must be turned to making these a success. Everyone must back the team and must act when called on. Show your spirit and there will be much to show for it later!

Auburn Samford

A more recent look at the Auburn/Samford Rivalry, 2011

Adapted from:

Howard Entre Nous, 1929.

Howard Crimson, October 31, 1928.

http://www.al.com/sports/index.ssf/2011/11/samford_field_goal_cuts_auburn.html

Homecoming 1955

With Homecoming upon us this week, we are taking a look back at what Homecoming was like almost 60 years ago.  Howard College Homecoming, October 22, 1955 as covered in the Crimson and the Entre Nous:

Howard Bulldogs vs. University of Mexico Pumas at Legion Field

at the airport - best

Approximately 300 cheering Howard students greeted the University of Mexico football team at the airport when they arrived the Thursday night before the game.

at the plane - best

The game took place at Legion Field and was the first time a Mexican team had played in Alabama.  Howard lost the game 41-13, but the 5000 Howard fans remained in good spirits encouraging their team to the end.

homecoming court

Miss Homecoming was crowned during half-time.  Candidates had to be single and a full-time student with at least 30 semester hours completed at Howard.

car sketch

Howard held a car parade downtown at 10:00 am before the game.  A $5.00 prize was awarded for the best decoration.  Above is an inspirational sketch for a similar contest in 1954 drawn by our very own Lowell Vann during his time as a student on the East Lake campus.

Baptists, Halabaloo and Bear Bryant, a commentary on school spirit on the anniversary of an historic football game

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With Football season well underway, and the Bulldogs preparing for their first conference game of the season, the Bull Pup would like to take a look at school spirit.  These days, we have Moses and the Red Sea boosting spirit at the games, but what was Howard spirit like in the early 1900s?  Some suggested the best way to show school spirit at the time were through emotional game chants which often sounded like a Pentecostal revival meeting:

Halabaloo Ka – Halabaloo Ke neckaneck – Wa he-wa hi Howard, Howard, Rah rah, Who rah, who-rah!  Ching, Ching, Chow, Chow, Boom, Boom, Bow-wow, Howard!

Skyrocket ZZZZZZZZZZZ-Boom-ah (Whistle) – Howard!

Cheers such as these led the Bulldogs to the non-win triumph over the defending Rose Bowl champion Alabama Crimson Tide 78 years ago on September 28, 1935 at Denny Field in Tuscaloosa.

The Howard team arrived in Tuscaloosa at 9 a.m. that Saturday, September 28 more as lambs to the slaughter than ferocious bulldogs.  The 4,000 Alabama alumni and students in attendance expected to see, as a Birmingham journalist wrote, “Howard tumble” in a “warm-up affair” for the mighty Crimson Tide.

A low-scoring defensive struggle, Alabama’s Jimmy Angelich made the only score in the first half.    The Bulldog offense had no sustained drives until late in the fourth quarter, when a “slugging penalty” by Alabama gave Howard the ball at the Crimson Tide’s 37-yard-line.  On fourth-and-five, Howard’s “plucky halfback” Ewing Harbin threw a perfect pass to Dave Snell who scored the touchdown to cut the score to 7-6.

A backup halfback, Penny Penrod, jogged on to the field for the extra point.  One writer described him as “cool and calm” as he sighted the cross bars.  “Then the ball was passed and he booted a perfect kick from placement to raise Howard to the (ultimate) heights in football—a tie with Alabama.”

For Howard Coach Billy Bancroft and his boys, the tie with Alabama was just as satisfying as a win.  For the Alabama players a tie brought no satisfaction.  A starting end on the squad, Paul “Bear” Bryant later quipped that a tie, “was like kissing your sister.”

The Bull Pup doubts that any 2013 fraternity brothers will be yelling “Ke neckaneck” this Saturday, but the same Samford spirit will be on display. Where did our school spirit originate? Samford Spirit, formerly Howard Spirit is more than just school pride.  According to Baptist leader W.P. Wilks:

Who creates the Howard Spirit?  Do pupils or teachers?  You have some part in shaping it, but you are rather its interpreters.

. . .

Before we were born there was a Howard Spirit – the Howard Spirit.  Study the early days of Baptists in Alabama, learn what manner of men and women were these who blazed the trails for our feet and laid the foundations upon which were later built Howard College and every other helpful institution of Alabama Baptists before you would speak with authority of the Howard Spirit.

So on this seventy-eighth anniversary of the Bulldog’s greatest non-win in school history,  get out there and show our Bulldogs some Samford spirit.  And maybe throw in a “halabaloo” or two.  Bow-Wow Bulldogs!

Adapted from The Bull Pup, 1923-1924, The Alabama Baptist, October 27, 1921, Birmingham Age Herald, September 29, 1935, Tuscaloosa News, September 29, 1935

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